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Capital Cities and Tombs of the Ancient Koguryo Kingdom

The Goguryeo sites and tombs found in Ji'an, Jilin, including Wandu, Guonei, and the pyramidal General's Tomb, together with Wunu Mountain City, a Goguryeo site found in Huanren Manchu Autonomous County in Liaoning, have been listed as a combined UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Capital Cities and Tombs of the Ancient Koguryo Kingdom Location

The Goguryeo sites and tombs found in Ji'an, Jilin, including Wandu, Guonei, and the pyramidal General's Tomb, together with Wunu Mountain City, a Goguryeo site found in Huanren Manchu Autonomous County in Liaoning, have been listed as a combined UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Jilin is a province of the People's Republic of China located in the northeastern part of the country. Jilin borders North Korea and Russia to the east, Heilongjiang to the north, Liaoning to the south, and Inner Mongolia to the west.

Liaoning is located in the southern part of China's Northeast. Liaoning borders the Yellow Sea (Korea Bay) and the Bohai Gulf in the south, North Korea in the southeast, Jilin Province to the northeast, Hebei Province to the west, and Inner Mongolia to the northwest.

Capital Cities and Tombs of the Ancient Koguryo Kingdom Attractions

Goguryeo art, preserved largely in tomb paintings, is noted for the vigor of its imagery. It absorbed influences from the northern dynasties of China.

Goguryeo (traditional founding date 37 BC; probably 2nd century BC – AD 668) was a kingdom in the northern Korean Peninsula and Manchuria. It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, along with Baekje and Silla.

The modern English name "Korea" derives from the Goryeo Dynasty (935-1392). Goguryeo was also called Goryeo at that time (See Names of Korea). It is not clear what "Goguryeo" means, but it has been suggested that the name is related to a Korean word "Guri", meaning copper, because Goguryeo was famous for its copper mines.[1]. In addition, the Korean people may have once been called "Guhwan". Some scholars have suggested that "Guhwan" was changed to "Guri" or "Guryeo" when it was transliterated into the Chinese writing system. Thus, "Goguryeo" means the nation of "Guryeo" or "Guhwan", whose rulers have a family name of Go.

Goryeo-era records say it was founded in 37 BC by Jumong, although it probably dates back to the 2nd century BC, around the time of Gojoseon's fall. Other small states in the former Gojoseon territory included Buyeo, Okjeo and Dongye, all of which were later conquered by Goguryeo. It was a major regional power of East Asia until it was defeated by a Silla-Tang alliance in 668. After its defeat, it was divided between the Unified Silla and Balhae states of Korea.

Remains of walled towns, fortesses, palaces, tombs, and artifacts have been found in North Korea, including ancient paintings in a Goguryeo tomb complex in Pyongyang. Some ruins are also still visible in China, for example at Onyeosan ("Five Maiden Peaks") near Ji'an (集安) in Manchuria along the present border with North Korea, site of the state's first permanent capital.

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More on Capital Cities and Tombs of the Ancient Koguryo Kingdom

Description of Capital Cities and Tombs of the Ancient Koguryo Kingdom at the World Heritage Listing

Capital Cities and Tombs of the Ancient Koguryo Kingdom Photo Gallery

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